Wednesday, December 19, 2012

New Year's Traditions and Superstitions

There are lots of classical and not that typical New Year's Traditions and Superstitions you might have heard of, but there are also such you have never imagined that can even exist. The following blog is going to inform you about the best and to be cleared actually, New Year's Traditions and Superstitions about New Year. Just for fun!

Superstitions and New Year's Traditions

New Year's Traditions & Superstitions

Wear New Clothes - People believe that wearing new clothes on New Year's Day is a sign of the year to come and wearing good clothes during the year. Wearing dirty, old clothes will bring more of the same for the rest of the year.

Kissing at Midnight - Origins of this well known tradition are not as popular as the act itself. At the stroke of midnight, kissing a loved one was said to ensure continued affections between the pair into the New Year. Its antithesis, not kissing anyone at midnight, is believed to bring one loneliness in the New Year.

New Year's Traditions Kissing at Midnight

Good Riddance - At midnight on New Year's Eve, people once flung open every door in their house. The ritual was said to release the past year's misfortune—and let inside fortune in the New Year.

Paying off Your Debt - It sounds like a resolution but you're supposed to do this before January 1. This way you're even when the new year arrives and you start with a fresh slate. On New Year's Day you shouldn't pay out anything or make loans because this signals money leaving you. So buy your lottery tickets on New Year's Eve.

New Year's Traditions Paying off Your Debt

Singled Out - On New Year's Day, superstition maintains that a single woman should gaze out the window of her bedroom the moment she awakes. If she sees a man—any man—outside, it is said she'll be married before the New Year is through.

Time for Friends & Family - According to the superstitions, what you do in the New Year's Eve and what people are around you, these are going to be the people around you the next year and these feeling you will feel. So, surround yourself with your beloved people, have fun, and be amazing on the New Year's night.

Singing Songs - The next awesome New Year's Tradition in USA is more musical and artistic one. In past, old Scottish families that starter their new lives in the New continent have put the tradition to sing the Auld Lang Syne poem in the New Year's Eve. Of course, today, Americans are definitely not singing it, because most of them prefer to sing "Don't stop believing" by Journey, which is though a good start of the year, as well.

New Year's Tradition Singing Songs

Do Not Do Anything - It says you have to eat a lot. So, while lying comfortably in your armchair, make sure you have the following foods and products in front of you, because the tradition says they will bring you lots of money – corns, porky meat, and green vegetables.

Black Eyed Peas - It was once thought that, by eating black eyed peas on New Year's Day, the consumer would secure for himself a year full of monetary gains and good luck.

First Person - A bit odd and even strange New Year's Tradition connects the first person, after the clock strikes midnight, the first person to cross your home's threshold will be an influential force throughout the New Year. A comical sidenote: if redheads or blonde-haired individuals were the first to enter, it brought bad luck for a whole year.

New Year's Traditions First Footing

Winds of Fate - At one time, New Year's Day wind patterns were studied by more than just the local meteorologist. Northern winds were said to symbolize a year's-worth of unpleasant weather. A Southern wind would bring prosperity and luck. Tragedy and loss would follow New Year's Day winds blowing from the East. Contradictory fates would be at the heels of a Western wind, bringing plentiful bounty and luck to farmers - as well as the passing of a cherished individual.

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